Ooo, beginner, that's me!

Nov 15, 2019
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OK, bring it on... list your favorite newbie tutorials. I don't even know where to start.

I have always loved taking photos but decided to get serious. I haven't settled on a style or subject I like yet, so I'd really like to explore them all and see what sticks. Action, landscape, portraiture are my favorites right now. I like taking pictures that tell a story, so there's usually something going on.
I have a mid-range Sony now, and don't plan to upgrade my equipment until I really decide what path to follow.
Thanks in advance.
 
Nov 15, 2019
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Hey @CameraBlaq, 👋

Where to start... Well, I know it may be a little hard to digest straight away, but I would suggest Manual mode on the camera. Yep, right from the beginning! If you struggle with that, then dial it back to using Aperture Priority or Shutter Priority modes.

The reason I say this is that Manual mode forces you to learn how the three elements of ISO/Shutter/Aperture work together. With each aspect having a direct effect on the photographs that you are taking.

For example:

Shutter Speed not only has a direct effect on how much light hits the camera sensor but also how much motion blur will appear on your shots.

Aperture has an effect on how much light can pass through the lens (aperture) to the camera sensor, a large aperture the bigger the 'hole', the more light (and vice-versa). But this also has an effect on Depth of Field (how much blur appears on your photos).

ISO is how sensitive the sensor is to light, the higher the ISO the more sensitive the sensor, but a high ISO will also begin to introduce noise to the picture.

Anyway, I'm rambling and not very well... So give me two moments and I'll see if I can find something that explains it better.
 
Nov 18, 2019
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instagram.com
OK, bring it on... list your favorite newbie tutorials. I don't even know where to start.

I have always loved taking photos but decided to get serious. I haven't settled on a style or subject I like yet, so I'd really like to explore them all and see what sticks. Action, landscape, portraiture are my favorites right now. I like taking pictures that tell a story, so there's usually something going on.
I have a mid-range Sony now, and don't plan to upgrade my equipment until I really decide what path to follow.
Thanks in advance.
A good place to start is putting 'the exposure triangle' into YouTube. A lot of beginners ask things like "what's the best setting for a birthday party?" Or "what are the best settings for fireworks?"

That's like asking what steering wheel angle and gear you should use to drive to the store. You don't learn to drive like that. You learn the general principles of driving a car, then you can drive anywhere. Likewise, if you learn the 3 simple variables that control how a photo looks - the exposure triangle - you can take any photo you like.

So, learn about that, and read your camera's manual to see how you can apply what you've learned with your specific camera, and you'll be up and running in no time.
 
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Reactions: TokenGeek
Mar 2, 2020
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Completely agree with the above. I have only come to photography recently, and understanding how the Exposure triangle works (Aperture, Shutter Speed, ISO) has made a huge difference to how i shoot now, and has helped massively in getting me away from Auto modes.
 
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Reactions: lissa
Dec 10, 2019
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Hello,

Here’s what helped me the most as a beginner.

As there’s such an abundance of traditional and experimental categories of photography to explore, I soon decided which category inspired me above the rest. This allowed me to purchase an appropriate camera that would help me achieve my goals. Initially deciding and fully immersing myself in a specific category provided direction and focus as to what I was going to photograph and where I needed to travel to find my subjects. I never left the house wondering what to do!

I’ve thoroughly read the manual for every camera I’ve purchased. Know what each mode and setting provides. This presents a solid foundation from which to experiment with adjustments that might allow more opportunities for creativity by controlling how much or how little light you’d like to lend to the image you’re about to take, for example.

Learn what your particular camera does and does not do well. Staying within the comfort zone of the camera helps to minimize any “disappointing” results and this will allow you and your camera to forge an amicable and lasting working relationship! Learn to strive for a happy balance between the technical and artistic aspects of photography and above all, enjoy the experience!

Wishing you the best in your photography!

Tony
 

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