Watermarks

Jan 16, 2020
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What do you think about getting rid of watermarks? I use Photoworks to retouch my photos and recently saw their manual on how to do that (https://photo-works.net/how-to-remove-watermarks-from-photos.php). I know that sometimes watermarks really ruin the whole thing (like when you need a stock image for your blog post and it is covered with watermarks) but in general isn't it like taking someone's work to present it as your own?
Do you add watermarks and have you ever been in a situation when your watermark was removed from the picture?
 

sward

Administrator
Staff member
Nov 7, 2019
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I know that in a photo sharing group I'm in they 100% say keep watermarks on your work in case someone uses them without permission. If its not their work, I'd see if theres a way to credit the image creator before using it. :)
 
Jan 16, 2020
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I know that in a photo sharing group I'm in they 100% say keep watermarks on your work in case someone uses them without permission. If its not their work, I'd see if theres a way to credit the image creator before using it. :)
That's wise! I think we need to credit people who have created something if we use their work. Unfortunately not everyone does this.
 
I add a watermark to my photos that are shared online. I also make backups of my original images, so if I need a photo without a watermark, I can create it. I don't have to remove watermarks. I am suspicious of anyone who wants to remove watermarks, especially those that are "stock images." If you have paid for or have access to legitimate stock images, those do not have watermarks. If you are trying to remove watermarks from stock images, the chances are you are breaking the law.
 
Jan 16, 2020
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I add a watermark to my photos that are shared online. I also make backups of my original images, so if I need a photo without a watermark, I can create it. I don't have to remove watermarks. I am suspicious of anyone who wants to remove watermarks, especially those that are "stock images." If you have paid for or have access to legitimate stock images, those do not have watermarks. If you are trying to remove watermarks from stock images, the chances are you are breaking the law.
Yeah, I thought about the law too but it depends, doesn't it? Also I like your idea of creating backup photos without any watermarks, this is clever.
 
Yeah, I thought about the law too but it depends, doesn't it?
Depends? On what, whether you have respect for a law that protects the artist? Something else?
Also I like your idea of creating backup photos without any watermarks, this is clever.
It's not clever, it's just good practice. You should always backup your original work. I shoot in RAW, which provides the most information a photo can have, so I save all my keepers in their native format, as well as any development files (TIFF, PSD, etc.) that preserve any processing I've done to a photo, including any watermarks I may have applied. Those files can be re-edited any time or reverted to their original unedited form. It's the JPG images that are disposable and I don't worry too much about saving them. If I lose any in a drive failure or it's stolen by a computer thief, I can always grab my latest saved off-site backup drive and make the JPGs all over again. I wouldn't be able to do that if I lost my originals. I rotate portable drives that I save all my valuable files to (not just photos), backup regularly and keep one drive off-site (a storage unit a few blocks away) all the time. If catastrophe strikes between backups, I might lose files I've created since the last backup, but that's a lot better than losing everything I've created over the last 25+ years.

The very first thing I learned, less than a week after I got my first computer in 1992 was this: backup, backup, backup. That is not clever and it's certainly not an original idea.
 
Jan 16, 2020
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Depends? On what, whether you have respect for a law that protects the artist? Something else?
On the fact whether you will use the photo publicly or not. idk, if I take a stock photo for my phone wallpapers but I hate the watermarks on it I see no problem in getting rid of them. Sometimes they are placed all over the picture and it doesn't look nice. I mean, if you use the pic personally it might be OK.

The backups aren't a new idea - yes, but this is a good practice that many people don't have unfortunately.
 
Mar 2, 2020
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Surely removing the watermark is a breach of copyright ? No matter what the image is being used for ?
 
Dec 16, 2019
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Apparently I have not taken any photos good enough to steal, that I am aware of, but I use watermarks on Flickr and Facebook. In the online forums I am in I do not.
 
Jan 16, 2020
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Surely removing the watermark is a breach of copyright ? No matter what the image is being used for ?
Sorry, I've been away for some time. From the one hand, yes, it is, but from the other I don't even know. If you aren't going to make money out of the photo then is it really that bad? Idk, I wouldn't mind if my watermarks were deleted in order to get the nicer wallpaper image, for example. It's a tricky point, actually.
 
From the one hand, yes, it is, but from the other I don't even know. If you aren't going to make money out of the photo then is it really that bad?
If you don't know, you should learn before you use someone else's photo, even if you aren't going to try to make money from it. Here's an excerpt from the copyright office of the US government. There will be similar information available in other countries.

Is it legal to download works from peer-to-peer networks and if not, what is the penalty for doing so?
Uploading or downloading works protected by copyright without the authority of the copyright owner is an infringement of the copyright owner's exclusive rights of reproduction and/or distribution. Anyone found to have infringed a copyrighted work may be liable for statutory damages up to $30,000 for each work infringed and, if willful infringement is proven by the copyright owner, that amount may be increased up to $150,000 for each work infringed. In addition, an infringer of a work may also be liable for the attorney's fees incurred by the copyright owner to enforce his or her rights.


Whether or not a particular work is being made available under the authority of the copyright owner is a question of fact. But since any original work of authorship fixed in a tangible medium (including a computer file) is protected by federal copyright law upon creation, in the absence of clear information to the contrary, most works may be assumed to be protected by federal copyright law.


Since the files distributed over peer-to-peer networks are primarily copyrighted works, there is a risk of liability for downloading material from these networks. To avoid these risks, there are currently many "authorized" services on the Internet that allow consumers to purchase copyrighted works online, whether music, ebooks, or motion pictures. By purchasing works through authorized services, consumers can avoid the risks of infringement liability and can limit their exposure to other potential risks, e.g., viruses, unexpected material, or spyware.
Read more here: https://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/index.html

In the USA, ignorance of the law does not absolve you from obeying the law and is not grounds for dismissal of any legal proceedings.
 

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